How much money should you be saving?

Question How much money should you be saving?

Answer  Ten percent of your take-home pay.

Complete Answer  At the very minimum, you should be saving 10% of your take-home pay.

The 10% Affect  Saving 10% of your take-home pay may seem like an impossible task. It is if you try to do it all at once. If you do it one pay check/one purchase at a time, it’s not that difficult. I like to think of it as, “Small change equals big bucks.” For example, If you have $10 to spend on lunch, how different would your lunch be if you only spent $9? Instead of spending $100 for clothes, you only spent $90. Could you really notice the difference? That’s “small change”. If you do that for a year, you will have saved 10% of your take-home pay, that’s “big bucks”.

Financial Literacy Knowledge/Skill

Save 10% of your take-home pay.

Comments or Questions

Thank you for visiting the Financial Literacy Life Skill site. Please feel free to submit comments and/or questions you may have about managing your money (Financial Literacy).

Next week’s topic: How should you be using your savings?

What’s the difference between needs and wants?

Question  What’s the difference between needs and wants?

Answer  Needs are those things that are required for you to live, thrive and survive. Wants, on the other hand, are those things that enrich our lives, things that we enjoy, things that are nice to have, things that are important to us.

Complete Answer  Needs would include things such as shelter, food, clothing, health care, transportation, education and a marketable skill. In the example of Adam the imaginary person (post of August 29, 2016), he was spending 33% of his take-home pay for housing (shelter) and 16% for car expenses (transportation). Both expenses are considered needs and were within the guidelines of an effective spending plan.

Dining out, a new car, a vacation, going to a ball game with friends are examples of wants. In a recommended spending plan, wants fall into the category of Lifestyle. An evaluation of Adam’s spending plan showed that he was spending more than he as taking-home, and specifically, the excess spending was for wants; Adam’s spending was 42%, the recommended amount is 25%.

In summary, Adam needs to spend less than he is taking home, specifically, he needs to cut down on his Lifestyle spending. This may take a little temperance8, but with a little forethought and practice, he will be able to bring his spending down and spend less money than he brings home each month.

Helpful Hint  Cutting down on Lifestyle Expenses is the easiest way to spend less. Not going out for dinner, not buying those new shoes, making coffee at home, and checking out a movies from the library (free) are just a few examples of decreasing Lifestyle Expenses.

Financial Literacy Knowledge/Skill

Understand the difference between needs and wants.

Comments or Questions

Thank you for visiting the Financial Literacy Life Skill site. Please feel free to submit comments and/or questions you may have about managing your money (Financial Literacy).

Next week’s topic: Can you afford that?